test

test

Fruit with Frass. Assessing 1st Generation Codling Moth Injury

CM Injury to Ginger Gold 6.24

Codling Moth Calex End Frass and Fruit Injury with CM Larva 6.24.14

Codling Moth Calex End Frass and Fruit Injury with CM Larva 6.24.14

Codling Moth eggs were laid during the week of May 24th in Highland, NY. The first eggs hatched after about 220 DD, predicted to occur on the 31st of May (2014 Scouting Report). We have been seeing the development of frass in the calyx end of infested fruit over the past two weeks from programs ineffective against the pest, which indicates the presence of developing larva within the fruit. We are beyond the point of management for this generation of codling moth. However, to best assess management practices, scouting for levels of injury should be considered this week in the mid-Hudson Valley prior to ‘June Drop’ of infested fruit. If economic CM damage has occurred, your assessment of the injury in the field now will help to define the problem so as to modify pest management decisions for the next generation (beginning in late July / early August) and 1st generation in 2015.

Codling Moth Sting on Ginger Gold;  24, June 2014

Codling Moth Sting on Ginger Gold; 24, June 2014

CM larvae are primarily fruit feeders. Shortly after hatch, a larva may take a bite or two of a fruit causing an injury known as a “sting”, causing a surface blemish, remaining on the tree to harvest. If larva enter the fruit causing deep entries, the fruit typically fall during “June drop.” Larva will continue to develop within the fruit pushing frass out from the entry hole. They pupate and give rise to a 2nd generation of CM in late July (2013 Scouting Report CM Captures). The second generation adult flight begins in late July with larvae active in fruit in August and September. If left unmanaged, late populations can cause significant fruit injury leading to costly culling at pack out.

Cornell Fact Sheet on Codling Moth describes in detail the biology and life cycle of the insect.